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London Midland admits it got it wrong over its passenger assistance service

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David HenckeBerkhamsted
London Midland admits it got it wrong over its passenger assistance service
London Midland have admitted all the faults in their assisted passenger services that left my disabled wife and I stranded without help and surrounded by a faulty lift and a failed passenger emergency help line at berkhamsted.

London Midland has admitted that a " breakdown in communication " meant it didn't know that one of its stations was unstaffed, had a faulty lift and that its emergency passenger help service didn't work last Sunday.

The admission came in an email from the company in response to a complaint I lodged after being dumped at Berkhamsted with my disabled wife Margaret at the end of a weekend break from Liverpool.

I highlighted this in a blog earlier this week purely because I thought the situation was potentially dangerous and that train companies should be more careful in ensuring that their passengers can travel safely.

An email from Sarah Brassingham, a customer relations adviser, admits : " Unfortunately there was a breakdown in communication that meant that the team at Milton Keynes Central were unaware of the issues at Berkhamsted that evening, which were obviously compounded by the issues with the help point on your arrival.

Steps are being taken to address this with the stations and Passenger Information teams, and our Facilities team are resolving the issues with both the lift and the Passenger Information points as quickly as possible.

I can assure you that we take any assistance failures extremely seriously and apologise again for the inconvenience and distress caused."

We have been offered a rail refund for the Milton Keynes to Berkhamsted journey but it does raise wider questions. One solution would be to ensure that whoever helps a disabled person to get on the train informs the guard about the person's destination - so if there is no one there the guard can help. at the other end But that still doesn't get over the problem of faulty lifts or emergency help systems not working.

London Midland say their policy is " Pre-booked assistance is provided by the station team at staffed stations and by the Conductor on board the train when the station you are getting on or off the train at is unstaffed."

That raises another question. London Midland still has guards. If Southern get their way they won't be any and presumably if they have any unstaffed stations disabled people won't be able to get off the trains or be unable to travel.

That is one reason to back the RMT union case to keep guards on trains and fight the company and Chris Grayling, the transport secretary, who want to get rid of them.

#London Midland, #disabled travel, #failed equipment, #RMT union, #guards

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